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Welcome to the 2016-17 school year.

Public Health Agencies Scavenger Hunt

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

http://www.cdc.gov/about/history/index.html

  1. What was the primary mission of the CDC when it opened in 1946?
  2. How did the CDC accomplish its primary mission during the early years?
  3. What five strategic areas does the CDC now focus on?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/cdcfacts.html

  1. What is the CDC’s mission?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/report/2014/reports/global-health.html

  1. The “CDC protects Americans by rapidly detecting and containing new health threats anywhere in the world before they can come to the U.S.” Identify three key ways in which the CDC is accomplishing this.

http://www.cdc.gov/about/24-7/savinglives/index.html

  1. The CDC is a federal agency that is part of the United States, so why does it deploy scientists and disease detectives globally around the world?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/foodsafety.html

  1. Why is it important for the CDC to fight foodborne diseases?
  2. What does the CDC do to keep Americans safe from contaminated food?
  3. Why are Salmonella and Vibrio infections of concern to the CDC?
  4. What are some of the challenges to keeping Americans safe from contaminated food?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/disease.html

  1. What is one accomplishment of the CDC disease detectives?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/zoonotic.html

  1. Why is it important for the CDC to track and report diseases spread by bugs and animals?
  2. Name three common zoonotic diseases that are dangerous and explain how each is transmitted to a human?
  3. What are some ways you can protect yourself from zoonotic diseases?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/contagious-diseases-disasters.html

  1. Why is the CDC concerned with natural disasters?

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices

  1. How might the travel notices posted by the CDC be helpful to Americans?

 

The World Health Organization (WHO)

http://www.who.int/about/en/

  1. What is the primary function of the WHO and who does this agency consist of?

http://www.who.int/gho/tb/en/

  1. What are some ways the WHO is making progress on tuberculosis (TB)? Given some examples.

http://www.who.int/gho/immunization/en/

  1. What are some ways the WHO is making progress with the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) vaccine? Given some examples.

http://www.who.int/gho/malaria/en/

  1. What are some ways the WHO is making progress with malaria? Given some examples.

Internet Search

  1. Perform an internet search on the eradication of smallpox by the WHO in 1980 and briefly summarize your findings.

Conclusion

  1. Although they serve a similar purpose, the CDC is an American health agency while the WHO is international. Why is it important to have both?

 

 

Recent Posts

Genetically Modified Foods - Web Assignment

Genetically Modified Foods Web Assignment

 

Introduction                                                                                                                                  

  • Since they were first introduced in 1994, genetically modified (GM) crops have become common in the American supermarket and diet. Most GM plants are engineered to produce pest-killing chemicals or to resist weed-killing chemicals.  For example, in 1998, 20 percent of U.S. corn crops contained a gene for Bt-toxin, a natural insecticide that protects corn plants from the European corn borer, a major insect pest.  Bt-corn, as this GM corn is called, enables farmers to produce more food on fewer acres, increasing food production and profits.  Many consumers, however, are concerned about the long-term impact of these crops.  The European Union, for example, has effectively stopped the import of many GM foo crops and required that others be prominently labeled as genetically modified.  Should GM foods be more tightly controlled?

 

Task                                                                                                                                                  

  • Your task is to research genetically modified organisms to gain insight into the history, risks and benefits of GMOs, environmental impact, and whether GM foods should be more tightly controlled.

 

Resources                                                                                                                                       

Genetically Modified Foods – website - http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk

 

Process                                                                                                                                            

Understanding Genetically Modified Crops and Foods

#1 - What Are Genetically Modified Foods?

http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/what-are-genetically-modified-foods.html

  1. What does it mean to genetically modify food?
  2. Explain why a farmer would be in favor of GM foods.

#2 - Development and History of GM Foods http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/development-history-gm-foods.html

  1. What was the first crop to be genetically modified and how was it different than the non-genetically modified version?
  2. Why were Europeans against GM foods early on?

#3 - What are the Most Common GM Foods?

http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/what-are-common-gm-foods.html

  1. What are the two main types of GM crops being grown today?
  2. How are GM soybeans different from non-GM soybeans?
  3. How are GM corn different from non-GM corn?
  4. How are GM tomatoes different from non-GM tomatoes?
  5. How are GM rice different from non-GM rice?

Viewpoints in Favor of GMOs

#4 - Fact Sheet: Pros vs Cons

http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/fact-sheet-pros-vs-cons.html

  1. What are five benefits of GM foods?

#5 - Weather Resistance and GM Foods

http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/weather-resistance-gm-foods.html

  1. Why is a weather resistant crop of benefit to farmers and developing countries?

Viewpoints Against GMOs

#6 - Fact Sheet: Pros vs Cons

http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/fact-sheet-pros-vs-cons.html

  1. What are three issues with GM foods?

 

#7 - Famers and GM Foods

http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/farmers-gm-food-issues.html

  1. How are farmers being forced to grow GM crops and plants, even when they choose not to.
  2. How does the cost of growing food from GM seeds compare with growing food from non-GM seeds?
  3. Explain why a farmer would have trouble exporting his/her crops to some foreign countries.

#8 – Tracing GM Foods

http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/about-tracing-gm-foods.html

  1. Give two reasons why labeling GM foods is necessary.
  2. Describe one issue with labeling GM foods.
  3. How do European countries differ from America with regard to labeling GM foods?

#9 – Ethical Concerns and GM Foods

http://www.geneticallymodifiedfoods.co.uk/ethical-concerns-gm-foods.html

  1. How could a GM food cause an allergic reaction in a person?
  2. How could a GM food cause disease in a person?
  3. How could a GM food damage the environment?
  4. How could a GM crop harm animals and other organisms in the environment?

Conclusion

  • In the process of completing this Web Assignment, you have become informed about the history, risks and benefits, environmental impact, and whether GM foods should be more tightly controlled.

Do you think genetically modified foods need stricter controls or do you think enough is being done about their use?  Explain why or why not.  Provide two reasons from the assignment to support your answer.  One paragraph (5-6 sentences or more).

 

HMP

HUMAN MICROBIOME PROJECT

Research Assignment

The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) is a large-scale research project on the microflora of the human body.  Using the Internet, research and answer the following questions related to the HMP. 

Useful websites are included, but not limited to the list below.

  1. National Institutes of Health (NIH)

http://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-human-microbiome-project-defines-normal-bacterial-makeup-body

  1. Genetics - The Human Microbiome

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/microbiome/

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/microbiome/study/

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/gsl/diversity/

  1. Human Microbiome Project – The Elizabeth H. and James S. McDonnell III McDonnell Genome Institute http://genome.wustl.edu/projects/detail/human-microbiome-project/

 

Research Questions:

  1. What is the Human Microbiome Project?
  2. Why is the Human Microbiome Project important to health and medicine? Give at least three examples.
  3. How are microorganisms that are part of the human microbiota identified?
  4. What do we know about the human microbiome?
  5. In your opinion, what is the major challenge of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP)?
  6. What ethical concerns are associated with the Human Microbiome Project (HMP)?
  7. Why is the study of microbial communities of value to the human microbiome?
  8. What will the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) need for success?
  9. What are some of the outcomes of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP)?
  10. Select two articles of your choice to read that from the Publications section at the bottom of the website “Human Microbiome Project – The Elizabeth H. and James S. McDonnell III McDonnell Genome Institute”  (http://genome.wustl.edu/projects/detail/human-microbiome-project/) Summarize each article and cite your references.

Antibiotic Resistance WebQuest

Antibiotic Resistance WebQuest

Introduction

  • Can you imagine becoming ill and the treatment doctors used to use is no longer effective? This happens many times as a result of antibiotic resistance.   Antibiotic resistance is described as one of the world’s most pressing public health concerns.  How and why does this happen?  Who does this effect? Why should it matter to you?

Task

  • Your task is to research the controversial issue from four different standpoints: an everyday citizen, a livestock farmer, a doctor, and a scientist. It is up to you to come up with a summary of how and why antibiotic resistance happens, who it affects, and why it matters to you.

Resources

  • WHO: Antibiotic Resistance Fact Sheet

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/antibiotic-resistance/en/

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/12/health/fda-to-phase-out-use-of-some-antibiotics-in-animals-raised-for-meat.html


 

Process

  1. Everyday Citizen

Websites: Go to the websites below to help you in researching the everyday citizen.  

  • WHO: Antibiotic Resistance Fact Sheet

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/antibiotic-resistance/en/

Questions:  Answer the questions below as they relate to the everyday citizen.

  1. Why should the everyday citizen be concerned with antibiotic resistance? 
  2. What are some examples of drug-resistant infections that the everyday citizen should know about?
  3. Why are bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics?
  4. How can the everyday citizen prevent antibiotic resistance?
  5. In addition to the everyday citizen, who else should be involved in the prevention and control of antibiotic resistant?

 

  1. Livestock Farmer

Websites: Go to the websites below to help you in researching the livestock farmer.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/12/health/fda-to-phase-out-use-of-some-antibiotics-in-animals-raised-for-meat.html

Questions:  Answer the questions below as they relate to the livestock farmer.

  1. What role does the livestock farmer play in antibiotic resistance?
  2. What are some of the concerns about using antibiotics on farms?
  3. What do livestock farmers say are the “other” sources of antibiotic resistant bacteria besides farm animals?
  4. Which animals and diseases are of the highest concern?
  5. How is resistance transferred to humans?
  6. How would you describe the history of using antibiotics on farms?
  7. How could using the same antibiotics in animals and humans be a problem?
  8. What has the FDA done to lessen the overuse of antibiotics on farms?

 

 

  1. Doctor

Websites: Go to the websites below to help you in researching the doctor. 

Questions:  Answer the questions below as they relate to the doctor.

  1. Why should doctors be concerned about antibiotic resistance within a healthcare setting, such as hospitals and nursing homes?
  2. What are some steps a doctor can do to combat antibiotic resistance in the inpatient healthcare setting?
  3. What are some reasons why antibiotic resistance occurs in outpatient healthcare settings, such in doctor’s offices?
  4. What are some steps a doctor can do to combat antibiotic resistance in the outpatient healthcare setting?
  5. Scientist

Websites: Go to the websites below to help you in researching the scientist.

Questions:  Answer the questions below as they relate to the scientist.

Tamar Barlam

  1. Explain what Tamar Barlam means in her statement, “Pharmaceutical companies play an indispensable role in developing new antibiotics, but they are also part of the problem.”

George W. Beran 

  1. Explain what George Beran means in his statement, “Their use is an effective adjunct to –but not a substitute for – optimal management, control of exposure and stress, nutrition, and sanitation in the food animal industry.”

Stuart B. Levy 

  1. What are some corrective measures and preventative strategies suggested by Dr. Levy in order to help prevent antibiotic resistance? 
  2. Who will need to participate in order to diminish the growth of bacterial resistance?

 

 

Stephen R. Palumbi

  1. Explain three ways suggested by Stephen Palumbi that can actually fix or slow the problem of antibiotic resistance.

 

Conclusion

  • In the process of completing this WebQuest, you have become informed about an important health problem from four different perspective: an everyday citizen, a livestock farmer, a doctor, and a scientist. You have learned how and why antibiotic resistance happens.  You have learned about the public health threat posed by antibiotic resistance and identified people and actions that should be taken in order to solve the problem of antibiotic resistance.

You will prepare a written summary based on the research completed in this WebQuest.  This summary should include the future of antibiotic resistance as you view it from your research. Are we on the right track to end this problem?  Who do you feel has the most power to enact change?  Who do you feel is contributing most to the problem?  What more do you feel could be done?  Do you feel other countries could be at greater risk?  Why or why not? 

Public Health Agencies Scavenger Hunt

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

http://www.cdc.gov/about/history/index.html

  1. What was the primary mission of the CDC when it opened in 1946?
  2. How did the CDC accomplish its primary mission during the early years?
  3. What five strategic areas does the CDC now focus on?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/cdcfacts.html

  1. What is the CDC’s mission?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/report/2014/reports/global-health.html

  1. The “CDC protects Americans by rapidly detecting and containing new health threats anywhere in the world before they can come to the U.S.” Identify three key ways in which the CDC is accomplishing this.

http://www.cdc.gov/about/24-7/savinglives/index.html

  1. The CDC is a federal agency that is part of the United States, so why does it deploy scientists and disease detectives globally around the world?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/foodsafety.html

  1. Why is it important for the CDC to fight foodborne diseases?
  2. What does the CDC do to keep Americans safe from contaminated food?
  3. Why are Salmonella and Vibrio infections of concern to the CDC?
  4. What are some of the challenges to keeping Americans safe from contaminated food?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/disease.html

  1. What is one accomplishment of the CDC disease detectives?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/zoonotic.html

  1. Why is it important for the CDC to track and report diseases spread by bugs and animals?
  2. Name three common zoonotic diseases that are dangerous and explain how each is transmitted to a human?
  3. What are some ways you can protect yourself from zoonotic diseases?

http://www.cdc.gov/about/facts/cdcfastfacts/contagious-diseases-disasters.html

  1. Why is the CDC concerned with natural disasters?

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices

  1. How might the travel notices posted by the CDC be helpful to Americans?

 

The World Health Organization (WHO)

http://www.who.int/about/en/

  1. What is the primary function of the WHO and who does this agency consist of?

http://www.who.int/gho/tb/en/

  1. What are some ways the WHO is making progress on tuberculosis (TB)? Given some examples.

http://www.who.int/gho/immunization/en/

  1. What are some ways the WHO is making progress with the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) vaccine? Given some examples.

http://www.who.int/gho/malaria/en/

  1. What are some ways the WHO is making progress with malaria? Given some examples.

Internet Search

  1. Perform an internet search on the eradication of smallpox by the WHO in 1980 and briefly summarize your findings.

Conclusion

  1. Although they serve a similar purpose, the CDC is an American health agency while the WHO is international. Why is it important to have both?

Epidemics:  Past & Present

Scenario

Epidemics have had a hand in shaping the development of humans throughout history, and continue to do so into the present and future.  In this activity you will learn about some of the major epidemics and pandemics that have impacted humans, and you will be able to investigate the outbreak and control of current epidemics.

Materials

Computer/Internet              

Directions

Part A. Epidemics:  Past

Task

Response

Go to the following website and answer questions 1 - 10:

http://news.discovery.com/human/health/10-worst-epidemics-130917.htm

 

 

 

 

1

Small Pox

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 

 

2

1918 Flu

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 

 

 

3

The Black Death

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 

 

 

4

Malaria

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

5

Tuberculosis

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 

 

 

6

Cholera

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 

 

 

7

AIDS

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 

 

 

8

Yellow Fever

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 

 

 

9

Epidemic Typhus

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 

 

 

10

Polio

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the disease?
  3. What are the symptoms?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

 

 


 

 

 

Part B. Epidemics:  Present

Go to the following website and answer questions 11 – 13:

http://emergency.cdc.gov/recentincidents.asp

 

Scroll down the list of “Recent Outbreaks and Incidents.”  Look for any recent disease outbreaks and scan through the article.  Find the three most recent outbreaks and answer the following questions for each.

 

 

 

 

11

 

Outbreak 1: _____________________

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the outbreak?
  3. What are the symptoms of the disease?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread of this disease stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

 

 

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

 

 

 

12

 

Outbreak 2: _____________________

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the outbreak?
  3. What are the symptoms of the disease?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread of this disease stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

 

 

 

 

 

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

 

 

 

13

 

Outbreak 3: _____________________

  1. When and where did it occur?
  2. What caused the outbreak?
  3. What are the symptoms of the disease?
  4. How did it spread? How was the spread of this disease stopped or slowed?
  5. Approximately how many people were infected or killed?

 

 

 

 

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.